Home > All, Security News > Is Trend Micro correct in its #OpIsrael ‘Botnets Involved in Anonymous DDoS Attacks’

Is Trend Micro correct in its #OpIsrael ‘Botnets Involved in Anonymous DDoS Attacks’

OpIsrael DDoS spike: 7 April

OpIsrael DDoS spike: 7 April

Trend has done an analysis of #OpIsrael attacks on April 7. It notes that on that particular day, traffic to one particular website, normally around 90% Israeli, became 90% international due to the botnet DDoS attacks.

This increase in non-Israeli traffic was well distributed, with users from 27 countries (beside Israel itself) accessing the target site.

This is factual and we can take it at face value from a company like Trend. The next comments, however, start with fact but end in interpretation:

[fact] Examining the IP addresses that had accessed the target site, we noticed that some of these were known to be parts of various botnets under the control of cybercriminals. In addition, further investigation revealed that these IP addresses had been previously identified as victims of other attacks like FAKEAV, ransomware, and exploit kits.

[opinion] These findings highlight how major DDoS attacks are, at least in part, not just carried out by hacker groups like Anonymous but by cybercriminals as well. These attacks are not nearly as “harmless” as some would think.

The interpretation is that because a particular PC is known to be infected with a bot, participation in the DDoS attack against Israel was necessarily under the direction of the botherder criminal. But an alternative interpretation could be that the PC owner, entirely independently, decided to take part in the protest. (This is unlikely given the need to hide the source IP during such a protest.) Another possibility, however, could be that an activist protester, not otherwise a criminal, could have hired a botnet from a criminal, not otherwise an activist.

My point is that the final comment (“major DDoS attacks are, at least in part, not just carried out by hacker groups like Anonymous but by cybercriminals as well”) is a non-sequitur from the preceding argument. Trend may be right; but should not be making such a bald statement without further ‘proof’.

It highlights a danger we all face as we shift our news intake from traditional newspapers to blogs: the automatic acceptance of an opinion as fact. Blogs, for their part, should draw a distinction between fact and opinion – and the conclusion of this particular blog should be clearly labelled ‘opinion’.

Categories: All, Security News
  1. January 13, 2014 at 10:55 am

    DDoS attacks are very real and cause many businesses across the globe disruption and damage. With the shift of news from printed newspapers, it’s easier for cyber criminals to get involved in the act of free speech and decide to silence a certain organisation. More needs to be done to protect organisations from attack!

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