Home > All, Politics, Security Issues > CISPA: there be dragons here, but we’ll keep you safe – just keep quiet and do what we say

CISPA: there be dragons here, but we’ll keep you safe – just keep quiet and do what we say

When the sea is calm and the sun is warm, it’s tempting to visit new and strange places. But if the sea is rough and full of danger, it’s safer to sit still, avoid rocking the boat, and do whatever the captain says. So when the weather’s good, the captain will warn about sharks outside, leaks within, and the coming tempest: so best sit still and do what we say. Fear is a remarkable tool for suppressing dissent.

But fear only works in the short-term – it has to be continually renewed for maximum effect. A better solution is to permanently shackle the crew so it cannot turn aside for those new and strange places. But how do you do that? The crew has to shackle itself, willingly. The answer is very simple; increase the fear level and tell the people that shackling will keep them safe.

The fear bit is easy. You don’t need to do anything; just recognize the opportunity and accentuate it. So when some idiot creates a video that is unacceptable, don’t ban it, just sit back and watch the effect and stoke the fires. When you make a diplomatic mistake and provoke the only possible response from a dangerous state, don’t diffuse it, just sit back and stoke the fires. And a few false flags will do no harm: you can foil them at the last moment to protect the crew. Hell, if one or two go wrong, a little collateral damage is no great price – just sit back and stoke the fires by locking down the entire city.

With waters this choppy, just offer the shackles, call them CISPA, and the crew will chain themselves to the oars and do whatever you tell them. Fear is a wonderful tool if you know how to use it.

Categories: All, Politics, Security Issues
  1. April 21, 2013 at 5:08 pm

    Reblogged this on #opManning.

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