Home > All, Security Issues > My willy is bigger than yours

My willy is bigger than yours

I got an email yesterday (29 April 2014). It said:

Today the Websense Security Labs found a new vulnerability in Microsoft Internet Explorer which affects Internet Explorer versions 6 through 11. However, current reported attacks are targeting Explorer 9 through 11. The Labs have issued a blog post which outlines solutions for those who have been affected by the attack.

Not another IE 0-day surely? Because FireEye found one just a couple of days ago. On Saturday (26 April 2014) FireEye blogged:

FireEye Research Labs identified a new Internet Explorer (IE) zero-day exploit used in targeted attacks. The vulnerability affects IE6 through IE11, but the attack is targeting IE9 through IE11. This zero-day bypasses both ASLR and DEP. Microsoft has assigned CVE-2014-1776 to the vulnerability and released security advisory to track this issue.
New Zero-Day Exploit targeting Internet Explorer Versions 9 through 11 Identified in Targeted Attacks

This is strange, because the 0-day ‘found’ by Websense two days later is also given the vulnerability assignation CVE-2014-1776:

A new vulnerability found in Microsoft Internet Explorer affects Internet Explorer versions 6 through 11. However, current reported attacks are targeting only Internet Explorer 9 through 11. The vulnerability allows attackers to remotely execute arbitrary code on the target machine by having the user visit a malicious website.

This vulnerability has been assigned reference CVE-2014-1776…
Microsoft Internet Explorer Zero-day – CVE-2014-1776

In fairness to Websense, its blog does not claim to have found the vulnerability itself – that is left to the email sent to journalists such as myself. But nor does it give any credit to FireEye – which would have been good. Just in case there is any doubt about who really did first discover this particular vulnerability (apart from the hackers of course), Microsoft’s advisory is quite explicit:

Microsoft is aware of limited, targeted attacks that attempt to exploit a vulnerability in Internet Explorer 6, Internet Explorer 7, Internet Explorer 8, Internet Explorer 9, Internet Explorer 10, and Internet Explorer 11…

Microsoft thanks the following for working with us to help protect customers:

  • FireEye, Inc. for working with us on the Internet Explorer Memory Corruption Vulnerability (CVE-2014-1776)

Microsoft Security Advisory 2963983

OK. So having established that FireEye really does have the bigger willy, and implying that Websense is a wee bit envious in trying to pass off the discovery as its own… what is this vulnerability? Well, it’s a bad one. Bad enough, in fact, for the European security agency, ENISA, to issue its own advisory (something I am not aware of it having done before).

  • This is a significant threat for IE users as there is no quick fix to repair, and “patch” this
  • Users who want to avoid the abovementioned risk should temporarily use another browser until this security gap has been fixed
  • Users should keep their systems patched and up-to-date
  • Many users have two different browsers installed so they should easily be able to switch. If not, this is a good reason why they should have it; when needed.
    ENISA

This is the best advice I’ve seen. While many experts are advising users not to surf in admin mode, to install EMET and to activate EPM, the majority of IE users will not even know what any of this means. Far simpler, and much more effective, would be to install multiple browsers (I’ve got five: Firefox, Chrome, IE, Safari and Opera); to keep them all fully patched; and to switch between them whenever a new 0-day is discovered for any one of them.

Categories: All, Security Issues
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